February 3, 2014
downfalling:

Macklemore won Best Rap Album when in reality

downfalling:

Macklemore won Best Rap Album when in reality

(via whiterosesandaeroplanes)

August 26, 2013

Hank and Marie react to Miley Cyrus’ VMA performance (idea credit).

(Source: conanofallon, via bearbeards)

July 27, 2013

Well, no more Titus Andronicus for me.  You don’t talk to a fan like that. 

P.S. I wasn’t judging them in any way. I just don’t follow any other artist of any kind that talks about a peer as poorly as they do. 

May 14, 2013
Just for Darren. Because he asked.

Memories of Underdevelopment

Tomás Gutiérrez Alea’s Memories of Underdevelopment is a Cuban revolutionary film that looks at how a man can be apart of the Cuban Revolution, but also apart from it.  He uses the film as a comment on how people behave in the midst of a revolution; of how a self-serving parasite can be seen as an appealing character in this world.  The aesthetic qualities of the film serve the “memory” of the title.  Giving the audience a look at documentary footage, flashbacks into the character Sergio’s life, and having Sergio narrate in his own voice allows them to see how the experience of the colonized contrasts to the experience of the colonizers.

The most striking aspect of this film is the aesthetics that Alea chooses to use.  The stream of conscious narrative creates a very specific point of view for the audience.  By being in Sergio’s head, the audience is able to see these types of people “for what, in the eyes of the revolution, they nevertheless were,” (Nowell-Smith, 184).  Sergio sees himself both part of and above the revolution, not really having a place in the world.  By giving the audience his point of view, they are able to experience how he feels.  The ambivalence of Sergio steps in for many people during the Cuban Revolution, and the film creates a way for this feeling to be explored.  Being released in 1968, many years after the start of the revolution, it is able to look back and see how the country has moved forward.  It questions if the country has moved forward at all.  The title refers to both the character and the state of Latin American Cinema as a whole.  Many of the countries of the time were seen as underdeveloped, and films that came from the New Wave explored these themes of underdevelopment.  They were memories that the filmmakers used to incite a revolution among the people, such as in Rocha’s Black God, White Devil.  By bringing these themes into the context of an individual, Alea was able to personalize the experience for the audience.  

The film manages to link the personal to the political by having documentary-like sections where the audience can see what is going on in Cuba.  These scenes connect Sergio’s conflict to the country’s.  They both want to belong in the world, but the actions that they have taken seem to have alienated them.  By showing this, Alea can deconstruct the Cuban Revolution and see how it stands years removed from the event.

The film itself, just like Cuba, doesn’t have narrative closure.  There are still questions as to what happens to Sergio and the country.  A feeling of “what next” pervades the end of the film, and leads to a feeling of unfulfillment.  The story of the Cuban Revolution is unfinished, and the film’s exploration of that theme remains unfinished as well.  Sergio still searches for his place in the world, despite the film not continuing onward.

Memories of Underdevelopment used themes common to the Latin American Cinema to explore the ideas present in the Cuban Revolution.  The aesthetic qualities that Alea used all contribute to how he can answer the question of where Cuba, and in turn the character of Sergio, belongs in the new world.  It also brings to light many themes that were inherent in earlier films of the Latin New Wave.  Underdeveloped countries made films to get the audience out and politically involved.  Memories of Underdevelopment takes these ideas and looks back on them; looks at how a country escaped the underdevelopment and what place it will hold in the years to come.  By presenting a very specific point of view, Alea was able to personalize these questions to the audience while also opening them up for the country as a whole.  The lack of narrative closure is just mimicking the way Cuba was left by the end of the 1960s.  Questions were still left unanswered as to how the country would fit into the world, and how it could escape it’s own memories of underdevelopment.

4:07am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZNOHqxkybTth
  
Filed under: Film Essay 
April 25, 2013
weathermanwess:

cadetkimkims:

Still great

THIS HAS SO MANY NOTES!

weathermanwess:

cadetkimkims:

Still great

THIS HAS SO MANY NOTES!

(Source: colepat, via this-bitch-empty)

April 25, 2013

thebluthcompany:

Netflix’s Arrested Development Character Posters

This is like Christmas in April.

[via]

(via this-bitch-empty)

April 23, 2013
totalfilm:

Watch the first Thor: The Dark World Trailer
Loki’s baaaack…

Jack White

totalfilm:

Watch the first Thor: The Dark World Trailer

Loki’s baaaack…

Jack White

April 5, 2013
Hey Everyone!

Go and follow goingnowherecsun.tumblr.com! This is my film that I am working on to graduate college.

Also go here: http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/377679/emal to donate and help Going Nowhere be an amazing film!

March 29, 2013
Hello all 42 followers!!!

Go and follow goingnowherecsun.tumblr.com!  This is my senior thesis film for Cal State Northridge, and we are working on making it the very best it can be.  Any and all support will be greatly appreciated!!!

March 14, 2013
bnho:

Presentation is everything in the culinary arts

bnho:

Presentation is everything in the culinary arts

(Source: boogaboogaben, via whiterosesandaeroplanes)

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